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, there is nothing positive, the environment, like the stock market, you have an environment that is positive. it goes up. so much is based on psychology. the environment in the business world is not positive. the environment that comes out of washington is all negative. and, i can't say we make decisions based upon tax codes. in our business, we're in a business of opportunity. i say we have three under construction because this environment creates opportunities. if you have some cash. landlords are willing to take a lesser rent if you will. employment is available because people aren't working. there are, out of the nonworking a bunch of that really do want to work and kacht find jobs. i can't say everybody that doesn't work wants to work. those opportunities present themselves we move forward. >> president will say he has cut taxes for small businesses. i what do you say to that? >> absolutely not. he can say whatever he wants to say. it is all very, patronizing the electorate. lauren: yeah. >> unfortunately this election on both sides very honestly there is a lot of credibility gaps. i wo
on renewables and it felt right to apply it to the environment which contributes 40% of emissions. ashley: how has it gone since early days? >> it has been a great lesson to join a startup company. we have gone the successful fund-raisers and to do it in a tough economic environment helped prove we need to be resilience and continually get the cost down and get buildings up faster and drive up that as that. is exciting to see large health-care companies and others adopting it. ashley: what is the average cost of the buildings? >> hard to say. education costs different from medical facilities but the key thing is right now the traditional construction project only 20% of what gets put into the final building price point why is material. 40% is a risk and overhead. we want to reverse that equation. we are more like boeing. quality manufacturing and the attitude is if bowling can assemble a 737 in a matter of days why does it take 24 months to get health care clinic? ashley: how these structures come? i they and flat pack can you put it together? >> precisely. they're so important to us because t
on top of a recessionary environment is a toxic mix. >> the ecb saying spanish bank deposits down 1.1% on the month in august, which means they're now the lowest level since april 2008. and we've got a prime minister there who has effectively said to the markets come out and short me because we're not going to go for a bailout unless webo costs go higher. and he's trying to delay aid until after the catalonia elections. and that seems like a pretty thin tight rope to walk. loan i. >> and we'll get the report on just how much money the banks need. it is suspected it will be in the 60 billion plus. but the elections on october 21st, that's rajoy's own province. and then you have the cat lo loaniloa loanian region think they're the richest region giving too much to the others. the rest of the region has seen a dramatic change. during the good times, they had revenue. from the developers, people buying properties, now that's all going and they're left from the legacy. from cat loan i can't to the canaries, you name it, all of these places, they're all struggling.alonia to the canari you
environment saying it's challenging and reported a drop in its first half net profit. it was really dragged down by some sluggish sales numbers. it's got a cost of one billion pounds. the company trying to fix its domestic operations, investing in stores, people and products. the online department has been a huge push. the contrast has been -- you can see the varying performances of these two stocks in the trading session today. its numberns coming in fairly well. this is the third biggest supermarket chain here in the uk. take a look at the spike in the airline. it's certainly making some strong inroads out there. raised its profit guidance. it's also reported a boost in strong demand from some of the european beach roots from london, so it's been using the flights to fly into some of those little nations. it seems as though the pursestrings for holiday travelers has certainly being loosened a little bit. let's take a look at what's playing out on debt markets today across the charts. you see prices are moving high. we're still seeing below the 1.5% level. the constant question mark surrou
, if anything, a deflationary environment right now, the inflation hedge, the inflation premium that you get from gold is going down. is that why the price is down? >> yeah. that's not going to last. um, you know, let's think about what's going on right now. we've got europe possibly falling apart, and we've got -- and the euro barely moving on that news. and you've got ben bernanke printing money. you know, i don't think that -- i think we got a little frothy on some of these commodity prices. look for them to form a bottom here and to start getting a bid. i think gold is going to start rallying here shortly along with soy, wheat and probably beef and pork. david: i tend to agree with you on gold anyway because the cb doesn't seem to be slowing down, and whether we like it or not, the fed's going to be printing money -- >> right. >> as long as we're getting free money from bernanke, i like to joke, gold's going to rally. i'm looking for $1800 an ounce relatively soon. but, you know, i think the real interesting thing is the s&p. we've got spain falling apart, and secession talk, and we've o
in on january 1. >> tom: meantime, the environment out there, we sought latest g.d.p. revisi yesterday, a slower economy faster than expected. corporate earnings also slowing down. that's happening regardless of what's going on in the political environment. >> it certainly is. earlier this summer, what was really driving stock prices, in my person was two words-- anticipated stimulus. notice, it's removal of uncertainty, and so i think the real question is will we be seeing a trough in corporate earnings in the third quarter, a trough in u.s. g.d.p., in this or the fourth quarter of the year? or might w be seegroughing a little bit later on for other international g.d.p.s. in general, i think a lot of people are anticipating that maybe the worst will soon be behind us, especially because of all this liquidity that's been pumped into the system over the past several months. >> tom: you've crunched numbers and brought some sectors to watch for next three months, including the technology area here with xlk, being the e.t.f. for the technology sector. has had a nice rally over the last 12 months. wh
that in a crisis environment at the 11th hour, some sort of arrangement will be made that will delay the fiscal contraction that's on the books now. so that the economy will continue to grow in the first half of next year, but at a slow pace. >> susie: thanks, joel. joel prakken, chairman of macro economic advisors. >> tom: still ahead, what's worse than training somebody and having them leave? not training somebody and having them stay. an on the job training program designed to create new jobs. in just a few hours, president obama and governor mitt romney will face off in the first presidential debate. as both candidates fight for votes, each has clear objectives: governor romney needs to rebuild momentum for his campaign, and the president is looking to widen his lead in the polls. to do it, they're each using their own sets of numbers. darren gersh breaks them down, and tells you what you need to know about them. >> reporter: for challenger mitt romney, tonight's debate is his best chancto sell hielf to voters who are still undecided. and one way to do that is to focus less on facts and agg
of cisco, having the experience that you've had at yahoo! tell me how you see the environment changes and where specifically you would expect growth to happen in technology in the next five years. >> well, i think technology in general -- probably the biggest challenge is not so much the social interactions but everybody's talking so much about data. data is very, very hard to mine correctly. so i think you're going to see a push back towards a lot of enterprise apps that really figure out how it get information to the companies so they can actually be more personalized for the user, but easy to say, a lot to do. >> and really quick, on what you're seeing out there, how tough is europe right now for technology? what are you seeing in terms of the global slow down? >> well, europe continues to baffle us in general in technology. it looks like it's getting softer, not stronger. you know, companies that diversified over the past 20 years do make sure they had good portfolios in all the regions, you know, are taking a hit now with europe. i think it's broad based, so it shouldn't be a kno
to stimulate cargo. the cargo has to be there from the manufacturers and from the general economic environment. but next year, the car go industry might pick up a little bit. the conditions for cargo are still very bad now. but again, overall the industry of course is still more passenger than cargo. and it's been a bit of a double whammy this year because for the long call carriers operating out of asia, they're heavily exposed to markets like europe where there's been an impact. >> are we going get anymore meaningful consolidation? i don't see eus saying to america you should really allow for proper mergers between european and u.s. airlines. do you think that's ever going it to be allowed? >> there's still a lot of steps to be taken to allow that to happen. true global consolidation, a lot of countries still have policies that limit foreign investment in the airline sector. so we need to see a lot of changes in the regulatory environment to allow that to happen. in the meantime, we did see a lot of consolidation continue to happen within regions like latin america, like north america, like
and retail business are rising. and also in some lines of the industrial business. so the overall environment for the insurance industry is very good. your free float is about 20%. will you stop here for a while or will you raise money in the future? >> we'll raise money in the future, however, not for the next 24 months. we are sufficiently capitalized now after this ipo on for the next 24 months, but there will be further capital increases in the future. this is just our first step in to becoming a listed insurance company. >> all right. and just give us your view where we stand at the moment with the world economy. because it's interesting where you're looking at your operations. eurozone still in the grips of recession or low growth, weaker growth in asia. just give us your sense of how you view the world and how it transfers back into your business. >> i'm 100% sure that the euro will survive. the euro is instrumental for the future of europe. the emerging market particularly in brazil and mexico are very interesting growing markets for the future. and also the middle and eastern europea
it disappointing. now, i think paychex is a well-run business. while the company is facing a tough environment, the quarter wasn't terrible by any stretch of the imagination. it beat it by a penny on a 40 cents basis and 2% year over year. last time i thought that was the hugely important key metric. however, the growth year seems to be decelebrating. especially since that's why i'm thrilled to have marty, the chairman and ceo here to talk about the quarter. mr. mucy, welcome back to "mad money." >> good to be here, jim. >> i've got to oh tell you, i've been through these various downgrades and it's almost like they thought that the payroll numbers had dropped so we have 6.5 to 7% unemployment. the fact is we always thought it was this number that we cared so much about which was the actual 2% revenues number. it suddenly didn't matter. all the people looked at was you guys didn't capitalize on the gigantic increase on employment on the matter. >> we thought it was a good quarter. it met our expectations, client base and client retention all improving. we felt good. it was a good start to the
. ashley: charles, bringing you back in. i want to know what you like in this environment? what's your picks? >> i just want to respond to the previous guest. ashley: go ahead. >> all that's in the stock market are shares of stocks and money. the market goes up because companies didn't want zero return on their balance sheet cash so they bought shares back. unfortunately, that stopped in september. september was the first month in the $20 billion more share sales than buying. insiders are now -- for the last two months, sold 1 # 1 times the amount of shares bought. the sell by ratio is 11-to-1. the engyps that run market up shrink the float. companies grow the float, insiders selling, and, you know, yes, the fed is easing indefinitely. that means there's no more fed easing to anticipate. without anticipation, why is anybody -- you know, i don't see how the market rallies here. i could be wrong, but that's what i think. ashley: dan? >> the universe shrinks in two ways, share repurchases and companies buys other companies. 3m bought another, and when the deal is completed because it's a
says an employer has to provide a safe working environment, and if they don't provide a safe working environment -- which is really what the refs are there to do first and foremost, to keep the players safe -- then that union is empowered to watch over the resolution of that problem. and so far the coaches' and players' unions have held their tongues and not gotten involve with the this ref dispute. cheryl: you know, if you look at the amount of bets that were lost, especially on the packers' game, we're talking $150 million, granted some booking agencies are actually refunding because they say, look, the proof is what you saw on television. at the same time, though, do you this think that this is going to make the owners look bad because they're the ones that have so much of a financial stake in all this, they're the ones that are losing if their team loses based on a bad call? >> yeah. i think what're seeing now -- what we're seeing now is some tension among the owners because they realize they're damaging the nfl brand, and it's a brand that's been respected. it's roger goodell's
vulnerable in this environment? >> that is a tough call. i generally don't talk about equities we met. david: i know that tim certainly does. i know that you have some panning ones as well. let's talk about the ones you expect to do well. why do you think that international paper is a good stock. >> they are probably seeing pricing power. contrary to the data we are seeing, we are seeing names like them, really getting prices to consumers. their exposure there, this could mean eight up to 10%, you have seen it react already, it has more upside. david: las vegas. a lot of pickers love this stuff. why do you? >> well, you are still seeing a fair amount of exposure to an operation in singapore. about 30% of the revenue. only about 20% exposure to vegas. the numbers are just terrific. gaming revenue is great, a lot of stocks that are cheap. david: tim and brian larry, thank you for sticking around a little lower than usual. we appreciate it. david: colombia used to be the last place to do business. now, it has become the second-largest economy to all of south america. the man who orchestrated th
business decisions being made as a result of the uncertainty in the macro environment. >> the dow up 10%. the s&p 500 up nearly 500. nasdaq up nearly 20%. the dax up 25. pretty nice gains. at the beginning of the year, you would have taken all of those for the year, right? >> certainly. the reason being, actually stocks and corporates are generally in this economic crisis that we're seeing around the western world are the safe haven. you don't want exposure to governments. you don't want exposure to consumers. the corporates can manage their cost base. they can move where the demand is much more freely than say consumers can and governments can. so at the moment, money's got to go somewhere and it's hard to get too bearish on equities, given the yields and actually how demand is holding up for these organizations. >> that's what you were talking about, where else that money might go. so look, for example, at corporate credit where we've seen such an inflow into high yield. we've seen high yield returning in the range of 17% this year. so if you look into next year when it already looks
what moody's does in this environment, where actually we're discussing whether there will be intervention on the ecb? >> first of all, i think it is very relevant because this would bring spain's rating down to junk levels, which is the lowest of all three rating agencies, so it's a pretty big deal. and then the ecb program can't be implemented until spain actually says they want help. so it depends what happens first. i think it's going to be a slippery slope. finally, we've got the budget coming up tomorrow. there are more painful cuts, it could mean more pain for spain and more pain for the euro. >> there's a lot of tifs in tha. >> you could also argue that all the central banks have been ineffective in generating momentum in the markets right now. so even if they're persistently buying, it's really about risk appetite and sentiment. i don't think there's enough there. central banks could come in and make another announcement, but i think having just made these unprecedented announcements, that that could lead to firefighting. >> what are you targeting? >> lo
producers to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. >>> welcome back. we have weakness on wall street today. about 30 minutes left before the closing bell sounds. the dow jones industrial average down about 38 points in the home stretch. more from mary thompson. >> just about seven points above the lows of the day for the dow jones industrial average, pressured by europe. we want to highlight one group. you heard seema talking about some of the bounce back and the big tech names earlier today. the tech sector was the weakest performer among the ten we follow. energy right now has taken that slot. turning around in large part because we've seen a turn around in hewlett-packard. they've come off
. so there is -- it's a very skittish, very fragile environment. >> yeah. obviously, the q2 gdp numbers are old, a little dusty here, but they do not show any acceleration which is what we're trying to find clues to in the back half of the of the year. >> i think what happened is europe had a much bigger effect on business sentiment than many people thought. it's been dampening exports and capital spending which is what the durables reflect. as we moved through the summer and stabilized on europe, normally we might get some acceleration. the problem frou is you have the fiscal cliff and the election. people now have yet another excuse not to do anything. had europe not bled into the summer as long as it did, maybe you'd have gotten that spark in activity. but right now you just don't have it. >> are you taking a lot of solace in what housing's done, what confidence is doing? >> yeah, the housing numbers i think are great. that's one of the reasons the economy hasn't been strong to this point in the cycle. housing is keeping us from really stuttering on growth. we need more in housing, a
in this environment. how do you do it when we see the fundamentals are not keeping up with some of this market performance? >> it's a real challenge. the private client was tremendously traumatized by the financial crisis and spooked by technology glitches and continuing scandals in the marketplace. they still don't trust that if they put their money in stocks, bonds, mutual funds, it's going to grow in value over time. we've been encouraging them in as many ways as we can to move out of cash, move out of bonds, which they perceive as safe but have their own risks, into at least a benchmark waiting in equities. the problem is all through this year you've had overhanging uncertainty in the marketplace. first, u.s. economic growth, china, european sovereign debt crisis. those have been replaced right now by, as you've mentioned, fiscal cliff and debt ceiling negotiations. the investor is confused about where to go, but those investors who stayed in cash missed this rally that we've had this year. they shouldn't make that mistake again. >> are you saying don't stay in cash? you want to get on thi
lockheed's f-35 program most at risk. goldman sachs says the current downsizing environment increases the potential for m & a activity. with the clock ticking down to fiscal armageddon, expect defense companies to send out layoffs after the holiday. that's your q-4 channel check for defense. i'm jane wells. >> all right. so let's dig deeper into which defense stocks could feel the biggest impacts if we go off the fiscal cliff. >> joining us is jeremy devaney. do you think we'll see those sequestration cuts in defense next year, $55 billion? >> good afternoon, bill. thanks for having me on. yes, we definitely think the fiscal cliff is coming, especially the sequestration cuts or the budget cuts for the defense department. right now the polarization up on the hill is not allowing for any movement in legislation to resolve that issue. >> all right. so let's talk about sort of breaking this down. first off, when are you expecting the defense companies to alert employees that their jobs will be cut? is that october 1st or november 2nd? what's your end date? >> sure. we're looking at novemb
quarter, given both the domestic and international environments, the uncertainty we've seen, the election is coming. we did well for the third quarter. >> all right. sure did. thank you so much, jackie. don't even think about touching that remote. we have a lot more ahead on this friday edition of the "closing bell." >>> mortgage rates hit rock bottom again, so why aren't home sales blowing through the roof? housing in the spotlight up next. >>> and later, she's actually not crazy. the subsidized program for the poor has mushroomed since 2008 due to possible abuse. we'll talk to congressman tim griffin who's proposing a bill to reign it in. >>> plus, what happens in france stays in san francisco? maria speaks with a mitt romney supporter and hp ceo carly fiorina. when you take a closer look... ...at the best schools in the world... ...you see they all have something very interesting in common. they have teachers... ...you see they all have h a deeper knowledgeresting in of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's i
of the more mature companies. >> what matters is if you create an environment for people to invest in the united states. the last several administrations i went to washington if intel is going to build this next major manufacturing facility the net present value of the facility in a u.s. compared to a lower corporate tax environment is $ billion. it's a tough sell to be patriotic and have that facility in the u.s. cut the corporate tax rate down to a competitive level. i think technology will continue to advance. the problem is keeping the good ideas in the u.s. and create jobs. >> it can happen in spite of things or you can help or be sort of in the way? >> or you can facilitate for an economy which is growing. what we do with foreign graduate students, taxpayer money pays to educate them to get thai masters and ph.d.s and tech topics and our immigration policy says go home. it's a brilliant philosophy. >> you said the growth in intel will be abroad. whatever the tax policy is, i imagine you have to go abroad on manufacturing and engineering. you want to go to the customer. even i
are taking risks. >> oh, sure, in this environment, i mean, you know, we're watching liquidity like a hawk because there's great sense tomorrow morning it could go the other way, in effect you don't invest as much, you don't take as much risk. >> how would you counter the argument that businesspeople and the wealthy have had their way for the past 2030-years as they've increased their lead in terms of income disparity and gotten richer and richer, and you would have hoped that some of that would have trickled down, if it works you would have hoped the average person would have participated in the good times and haven't and you need a president that is going to come in for the powerless people that aren't able to set policy and pay to go do things and you need someone that will represent them in the future. how was is that pretty damned good? >> yes, sir. >> you can take this. thank you for writing it for me. >> i'll get you a job at "the new york times." the reality is as follows. the whole focus has been on how the quote, one percenters or ten percenters, how the top earners moved ahead o
's get straight to the markets and talk about investing in this environment. gentlemen, good see you. thank you so much for joining us. dan, let me kick this off with you. what do you think happened at end of the day today? seems this market has been trading on some worries last several sessions. yet, we did see some optimism at end of the day. >> absolutely. it's a case of perhaps, you know, still do not fight the fed. what we were watching specifically was apple. you mentioned it. we were looking for support on the stock at around 650. wouldn't you know it, it hit their intraday lows. they don't want to see that stock drop. the interesting thing with that is, you know, apple is a bell weather that's really driving the nasdaq 100, driving a lot of these larger cap benchmarks we follow. if you keep that buoyed, you're going to keep the markets buoyed going forward. >> that's a really good point. i guess, david, for those fund managers who have not owned apple, they're going to be playing catch up fourth quarter so their fund looks better by year end, right? >> it's possible. you have
to be a challenging environment. mandy, great point. china's deceleration is very important. it's very real. you're seeing that in commodity complex. i think that revenue line is going to be very, very important. that's probably going to come in soft. >> all right. we'll leave it there. thanks, everybody. appreciate your time tonight. we'll keep watching this market and the fundamentals around it. we look now where the big money is eyeing and whether or not foreign money is coming into the u.s. we have henry m henry mcveigh w. tell me what you're hearing. >> the clients with the long-term focus are the ones we traditionally work with. we see opportunities. we have a very big presence in asia. i was just over in hong kong and india. we're finding things to do on the consumer side. i would tell you, i do think the chinese economy in particular, the export economy, is structurally broken. i think that's a big change. i've been going to china since 1995. i think there's a fundamental shift in what's going on. we saw that in the caterpillar numbers. you saw that in the federal express numbers. some p
interest rate environment -- who isn't -- check out big pharma. which companies may be preparing to boost their dividends coming up. >>> as we head out, here's how the five biggest dividends in the dow jones industrial 30. our favorite, intel, up 1.68%. when you take a closer look... ...at the best schools in the world... ...you see they all have something very interesting in common. they have teachers... ...with a deeper knowledge of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. like in a special ops mission? you'd spot movement, gather intelligence with minimal collateral damage. but rather than neutralizing enemies in their sleep, you'd be targeting stocks to trade. well, that's what trade architect's heat maps do. they make you a trading assassin. trade architect. td ameritrade's empowering web-based trading platform. trade commission-free for 60 days, and we'll throw in up to $600 when you open an account. governor of getting it done.
the road, economic is an overhang to crude. >> how is the environment different than four years ago? >> four years ago we had a financial meltdown and there was a lot of leverage. and crude went to 149. that doesn't xifl exist this go around. >> john netto, thank you very much. >> tom: tomorrow, we continue "politics and the pits". we hear what gold traders are watching in this year's election. the positive data on home prices and consumer confidence wasn't enough to keep stock buyers interested throughout today's trading. it did help the morning trading with the s&p 500 in positive territory through the noon hour, eastern time. comments about the "meager benefits" of the federal reserve's latest bond buying program coming from the head of the philadelphia fed bank weighed on the index, and it sank into the closing bell, finishing down 1.1%. trading volume increased from yesterday's pace-- 752 million on the big board; just under two billion on the nasdaq. financial stocks, technology and the materials sector led the losers, down 1.5% each. caterpillar's warning about its 2015 earni
market, the environment, a bunch of things very uneven, and gas price that is have been higher, and take the scarce income away from consumers, and the nagging concerns about other things, about the elections, and what happens with tax policy and europe. and jobs and a little bit about gas. >> tell us a little bit about the elections. >> d do you think that people will feel better just knowing who's going to be in the white house, and then go ahead with financial decisions they were going to be making and buy whatever purchases they were thinking about. >> we hope it's going to work out like that. >> when they win, we don't know the congress they're going to work with. we don't know if it's something they can put their heads together and work with or the parties will be at logger heads. >> it will be organic. we have to see who is elected and the demeanor between the president and the congress he has to work with. >> susie: and you know we hear so much from the federal reserve about how much super low interest rats are going to help the economy. to what extent are the low rates motivatin
a little risk on in the short term, but european markets underperforming the u.s. >> in this environment, i'm a reluctant supporter of kuwaequi. you look at what we have, where bond yields are, where credit has gone over the course of the last six, eight months, you have to end up saying equities are the best of a band bunch. >> an improvement in the pace of job let claim filings. so just how much momentum is the world's juggernaut economy carrying into the fourth quarter? drew mattes joins us in studio. thanks for coming by. what is your view on the u.s. economy, how much momentum really is there as we look into the fourth quarter and next year? >> you're looking at growth in the fourth quarter probably not going to breach 2%. we're just going to have to learn to live with that. and as much as the job rest claims numbers are good news, we still haven't seen the pick up in hiring. so until we see that, i don't think you can get that much momentum. sdl they 00 a discussion about stall speed. are we headed in to recession or do we expect to slug it out here? >> what we found is the volatility
mass-oriented environments where it's pegboard and they point you to aisle four, go find it yourself. we've done research that shows in certain categories, especially foundation, the consumer shop en masse, she spends more than when she buys in prestige where she buys in the store to the exact match foundation. the value proposition is around service which is why in this market, in north america, very high percentage of the total beauty business that's done in prestige like macy's because of that service proposition and a relatively low, absolute value differential in the price point. >> we continue to see companies go in and have difficulty in china. one company told us last week that western companies are going into china with western views about the chinese consumer and their loyalty and they're finding that that consumer passes them by in different ways. are there lessons you've already figured out on that front? >> we've been doing business in asia for 30, 40 years. and we first started in japan in the early '70s, then expanded into korea and hong kong. we've been in china doing
that sports a yield, exactly the kind of dividend stock you want in this low interest rate environment. it's rallied since the beginning of the year, but lately it's pulled back three points. it could be giving you a good entry point here. first though, before making any decisions let's take a closer look with the chairman and co-ceo of prologis. brand new guest, brand new name. welcome to "mad money." >> nice to meet you. >> first, you just have the biggest building portfolio i've ever seen. it's global, right? just giant. >> it is pretty big and it's pretty good, which is more important, right? >> the reason i asked, normally i like to have real estate investor guys on because they know the tenor of the united states but you have huge exposure. in your most recent conference call you actually talk about -- what it's like in japan, china, brazil, canada. mexico. and these are doing very well. >> they are indeed. we're in 21 countries and with the exception of a few countries in europe, the rest of the world is actually doing pretty well. including some of the places in europe and northern
would have the federal government take advantage of the low interest rate environment and issue $500 million in 30-year bonds to fix the nation's infrastructure. fifth, i would slap tariffs on goods made by countries. that would stop the endless parade of jobs migrating from our country to other countries. they have a ridiculous competitive advantage over us. six, i would insist there be a course in high school called money where kids could learn what money is, how to save, how to invest. people need education about the stock market. perhaps to find their own therapeutics. seventh, i would appoint a steven jobs memorial competitiveness czar to figure out how our businesses could be made more speft and find out what they need. not government handouts but trying to get educated engineers to help these companies. i would reappoint ben bernanke as chairman of the federal reserve. if it weren't for him, he would never have gotten out of the great depression to begin with. without bernanke, we have nationalized the banks and be stuck with unemployment over 10%. here's the bottom line. nobo
. obviously a low-interest environment, what is another point you want to make? i have been following them for years. >> there of 15% so they have done well. they are benefiting from lower interest rates to a 220 year low. credit spreads are tightening too so cost of money coming down but more importantly commercial real estates are very strong. very little construction activity in the 2012 period. where we are today is demand greater than supply so rent is going up for many property types in many parts of the country. the average yield is 3.3% so investors are looking for a little in come. cheryl: you talk about the fact that people are moving into apartments and things like that because you have hotel and health care and old folks and the apartment buildings. looking at your top holdings, simon property. biggest name in the business. >> a large holding in the index and a fund. stocks have done well this year. and they do have discretionary money to spend and nordstrom or what have you but they participated in the economy of the last year or two so they have been benefiting and they have
about in new york or lower cash minimum-wage for certain employees. much easier environment. dave: you are not beginning new project particularly because of regulations. >> no plans to open up here because of regulations. don't understand what is going on. dave: like what? >> number one is obamacare. we don't understand it and when we ask consultants it costs money and get different answers from different people because no one understands what is going on. because of that i am not going to hire 50 employees because that is $100,000 penalty. dave: if you have less than 50 employees you don't do as much. they don't want to hurt small business but that prevents people from hiring more than 50 people. >> they come up with numbers and think 50 means you are a big business and can withstand any new initiatives they have but it is not based on the number of employees but your bottom line. your profit. >> 50% of small-business owners would not start a business today if they had no what they're getting into with the new regulations. what about you? >> risk purses reward. right now the tables ha
does not feel the competitive environment -- it is down 4% but also down 6% year to date. tough time when david einhorn piles itown by it is coming back. david asman down 36 points. dave: david einhorn was shorting one stock but also long enough. when david einhorn speaks people listen. cheryl: when nicole petallides speaks we listen. the new york stock exchange giving up early-morning games. nicole: at talk to some traders talking about the fact we have been in a narrow range and the choppy market and that is the day today coming close to the unchanged line. dave: apple is in the green. earlier it was in the red and had the $650 mark and was $700. people saw 650 and it won't be this low for long. nicole: people see that as a buying point. people like to bion that and go into that category and they go into that category. cheryl: chipotle diving today but made some bearish comments on the other side and as i mentioned general motors and warren buffett got in a little while ago. nicole: you don't fight einhorn. going against that particular day. the competition is up and general
with a diverse group of needs. what is it you offer? an easy regulatory environment? educated workforce? low tax rate? what is your main draw? >> to be successful you have to do it all and we are focusing on all those things. we built on technology. texas instruments was one of the founding fathers and when you build a city on technology that happens. when we have the f.w. airport when you get any place in the nation very quickly the third busiest airport in the world, it helps a lot and city hall we make sure we get things in and out and make decisions and don't get caught up in a lot of bureaucracy. try to minimize that as much as we can. melissa: some things to highlight. you have a budget surplus of $2.3 million and that has to do with property tax base because home values did not go down -- go up or down as much. they have been stable. over the next five years you see 12.8% job growth ranking number 4 nationally. the biggest category you are going to add 127,000 professional and business service jobs. who should come to dallas looking to find a job? >> at at&t, move from san antonio and att
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